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and thank you for your service overseas as well. we have just gotten this, a bulletin from law enforcement. people being asked to be on the lookout for a darker skinned or black male with a black backpack and a black sweatshirt, possible foreign national, accent unclear, what the accent of the individual is, but believes to have some sort of an accent. we are just getting that information. john king is working his sources now. he joins us with the latest on the investigation. john, what are you hearing? >> well, that bolo, shorthanded police lingo for be on the lookout, just issued. i will give you reporting from all of our cnn team. a little more on that bolo. law enforcement is looking for a darker skinned or black male with a black backpack, possible foreign national because of an accent. the bolo notes to law enforcement officials says five minutes before the first explosion, this individual attempted to gain entry to a restricted area and when turned away, he broke eye contact and pulled his sweatshirt and hood over his head. no further info on him is what the bolo says. this is law e
the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's what they are. if you make them into sort of a bigger deal than he is or anyone is, it sort of gives them a relevance we actually don't want to. so a lot of people in national security and counterterrorism love this idea. not only because of the legal underpinnings behind it but also because it sort of says to anyone who would harm us, you're just a criminal. >> there has also been a lot of successful prosecutions of terrorist suspects in criminal court. >> you can learn a lot of evidence from this. when i first got into this field it was right after the africa bombings, african embassy bombings in '98, and some of the
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)

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